Your Dog`s ‘Hot Spot’ & How To Treat It

Hot spots are also called Acute Moist Dermatitis or Moist Eczema and the spots can appear anywhere on the body.The area affected can spread quickly. There are a variety of causes for this disorder, but the most consistent factor is a bacterial infection.There are many kinds of bacteria that can be cultured from a hot spot.

Most of these bacterias will respond quite well to oral and topical antibiotics. No matter what breaks or irritates the skin, it creates the right environment for bacterial contamination, if the skin is wet. The body responds by itching or becoming inflamed. This in turn makes the dog lick and chew the area, it damages the skin more and the cycle of itching, scratching and chewing begins.

If left untreated, the infection can go deep into the layers of the skin. Hot spots normally occur in the summertime, so many owners will keep their dogs shaved during this time. It seems to help keep dampness off the surface of the skin.

Regular grooming can help you find these spots quickly and will get worse and worse until treated so get him to the vet! It could turn into a Lick Granuloma if left untreated and this can be difficult to cure.  as per  www.articlecircle.com

The most common spots for hot spots are the flank areas and the side of the face. Young dogs and Golden Retrievers seem to be more prone to it and cats rarely, if ever, get this condition. For treatment, you should clip the hair around the spot. Clean area with an antiseptic solution like Chlorhexidine and apply a topical antibiotic cream. You may need to use a buster collar to keep the dog from licking the cream off.

You must break the scratch cycle so usually a one-time steroid shot is very effective, though sometimes the dog will need a series of oral steroids. A common side-effect of the steroids is the dog will be more hungry and thirsty. Oral antibiotics are the best way to treat the hot spot. For an advanced hot spot, the dog may need a 10 to 14 day treatment with a broad spectrum antibiotic to prevent recurrence. For questions about your pet, you can visit:  www.whydoesmypet.com

your dogs hot spot treatment old danish pointer Your Dog`s Hot Spot & How To Treat It

Image source  en.wikipedia.org  used with permission

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